what are you reading?

  • sParn 08-11-2017, 08:28 PM
    (08-07-2017, 09:29 PM)Hexd Wrote:
    (08-07-2017, 06:50 PM)sParn Wrote:
    (08-06-2017, 06:43 PM)Hexd Wrote:
    (08-06-2017, 06:04 PM)sParn Wrote: Hey! It's awesome...the concepts he introduced into the space and automotive industry alone made me fascinated with him though I never really knew much about him as a person or entrepreneur. His childhood was interesting and I related with him on his curiosity especially when it came to computers as a lad. His startups and sometimes harsh, though progressive, methods of pushing his businesses forward continue to astound me, I'm particularly excited to see where things go with Neuralink being someone heavily into Transhumanism :)

    Now how's Paper Girls? I've heard of that and Saga just haven't read them yet :/


    That's awesome, any  particular harsh methods of pushing his business you could summarize? I think Elon is super inspiring and I hope him well in his businesses although I think Neuralink is a bit too much much I do look forward to the Tranhumanist evolution.

    Paper Girls is pretty good, very different to anything else I've read and Saga is amazing all time favorite and best written\drawn graphic novel I've read to date.


    I suppose harsh in terms of (at times) treatment towards employees however that is necessary when running innovative companies that could change the world. He definitely separates himself from emotion and humanity at times to ensure business is pushing forward which in turn leads to cutting fat more often than a typical company, even if it was someone who was a lifelong friend or a person who dedicated their life to his company for years if not over a decade. He's still brilliant though and certainly let his imagination and visions of the future transform his companies. Out of curiosity what about Neuralink do you hesitate on?

    And that's awesome! I gotta get caught up, I have a list of graphic novels and mangas I have to read before I die lol. I think the old Hellsing mangas are next on my list.


    Um from the tiny amount that I know of Neuralink is that they plan to implant chips in brains so humans can compete with A.I.'s but I don't think implanting a chip that will let advertisers get even more data on you is a good idea


    True.. I'm more interested in cellular repair, brainwave monitoring, blood flow correction, etc. If cybernetics can prevent things such as cancerous tumors, aneurysms, etc. that would be a more productive approach. Also if brainwaves and electric patterns can be replicated, can the human thought and "mind's eye" concept be visualized in an interface. 

    Just cool, crazy things that may one day be a possibility :) huge interest.
  • Backlash 08-11-2017, 09:55 PM
    (08-11-2017, 08:28 PM)sParn Wrote:
    (08-07-2017, 09:29 PM)Hexd Wrote:
    (08-07-2017, 06:50 PM)sParn Wrote:
    (08-06-2017, 06:43 PM)Hexd Wrote: That's awesome, any  particular harsh methods of pushing his business you could summarize? I think Elon is super inspiring and I hope him well in his businesses although I think Neuralink is a bit too much much I do look forward to the Tranhumanist evolution.

    Paper Girls is pretty good, very different to anything else I've read and Saga is amazing all time favorite and best written\drawn graphic novel I've read to date.


    I suppose harsh in terms of (at times) treatment towards employees however that is necessary when running innovative companies that could change the world. He definitely separates himself from emotion and humanity at times to ensure business is pushing forward which in turn leads to cutting fat more often than a typical company, even if it was someone who was a lifelong friend or a person who dedicated their life to his company for years if not over a decade. He's still brilliant though and certainly let his imagination and visions of the future transform his companies. Out of curiosity what about Neuralink do you hesitate on?

    And that's awesome! I gotta get caught up, I have a list of graphic novels and mangas I have to read before I die lol. I think the old Hellsing mangas are next on my list.


    Um from the tiny amount that I know of Neuralink is that they plan to implant chips in brains so humans can compete with A.I.'s but I don't think implanting a chip that will let advertisers get even more data on you is a good idea

    Just cool, crazy things that may one day be a possibility :) huge interest.


    My only problem with this is that these technologies will only be developed if they can prove profitable. No matter how much a physical good or technology might benefit humanity, it only gets developed if someone can make a quick buck offa it.

    The only exceptions are pipe dream projects like asteroid mining. I feel as if people like Musk are more content to ponder imaginary problems than try to solve the ones we're actually dealing with.
  • lzdg 08-13-2017, 06:22 PM
    I don't usually read any books, like at all, but I've been reading 1984 lately. it's been on my list of books to read forever.
  • Backlash 08-13-2017, 08:16 PM
    (08-13-2017, 06:22 PM)lzdg Wrote: I don't usually read any books, like at all, but I've been reading 1984 lately. it's been on my list of books to read forever.


    Ooh, classic! How're ya likin' it so far?
  • lzdg 08-13-2017, 08:58 PM (Edited 08-13-2017, 08:59 PM)
    (08-13-2017, 08:16 PM)Backlash Wrote:
    (08-13-2017, 06:22 PM)lzdg Wrote: I don't usually read any books, like at all, but I've been reading 1984 lately. it's been on my list of books to read forever.


    Ooh, classic! How're ya likin' it so far?


    it's pretty good, I'm starting to see how much popular fiction was inspired by it, like Half-Life 2, The Matrix, V for Vendetta, etc.
  • sParn 08-13-2017, 10:48 PM
    (08-11-2017, 09:55 PM)Backlash Wrote:
    (08-11-2017, 08:28 PM)sParn Wrote:
    (08-07-2017, 09:29 PM)Hexd Wrote:
    (08-07-2017, 06:50 PM)sParn Wrote: I suppose harsh in terms of (at times) treatment towards employees however that is necessary when running innovative companies that could change the world. He definitely separates himself from emotion and humanity at times to ensure business is pushing forward which in turn leads to cutting fat more often than a typical company, even if it was someone who was a lifelong friend or a person who dedicated their life to his company for years if not over a decade. He's still brilliant though and certainly let his imagination and visions of the future transform his companies. Out of curiosity what about Neuralink do you hesitate on?

    And that's awesome! I gotta get caught up, I have a list of graphic novels and mangas I have to read before I die lol. I think the old Hellsing mangas are next on my list.


    Um from the tiny amount that I know of Neuralink is that they plan to implant chips in brains so humans can compete with A.I.'s but I don't think implanting a chip that will let advertisers get even more data on you is a good idea

    Just cool, crazy things that may one day be a possibility :) huge interest.


    My only problem with this is that these technologies will only be developed if they can prove profitable. No matter how much a physical good or technology might benefit humanity, it only gets developed if someone can make a quick buck offa it.

    The only exceptions are pipe dream projects like asteroid mining. I feel as if people like Musk are more content to ponder imaginary problems than try to solve the ones we're actually dealing with.


    While true I think that startups in the hands of the wealthy are a good thing because to them it's about power over the industry before profit, leading to breakthroughs in technology. And yes, Musk is a perfect example because he seemingly doesn't give a crap about money and more-so making sure his visions are put in place and the whole world accepts them.
  • Rooky_Ghost 08-16-2017, 06:05 PM
    (08-06-2017, 06:43 PM)Hexd Wrote:
    (08-06-2017, 06:04 PM)sParn Wrote:
    (07-28-2017, 09:57 PM)Hexd Wrote: How is it? any especially cool stuff you learned from it that you didn't know about Elon Musk?

    I'm currently raeding the Graphic Novel Paper Girls which is pretty great and is written by the writer of Saga which is my favorite graphic novel and has my favorite artist Fiona Staples working on it as well.


    Hey! It's awesome...the concepts he introduced into the space and automotive industry alone made me fascinated with him though I never really knew much about him as a person or entrepreneur. His childhood was interesting and I related with him on his curiosity especially when it came to computers as a lad. His startups and sometimes harsh, though progressive, methods of pushing his businesses forward continue to astound me, I'm particularly excited to see where things go with Neuralink being someone heavily into Transhumanism :)

    Now how's Paper Girls? I've heard of that and Saga just haven't read them yet :/


    That's awesome, any  particular harsh methods of pushing his business you could summarize? I think Elon is super inspiring and I hope him well in his businesses although I think Neuralink is a bit too much much I do look forward to the Tranhumanist evolution.

    Paper Girls is pretty good, very different to anything else I've read and Saga is amazing all time favorite and best written\drawn graphic novel I've read to date.


    Do you respect the women??
  • Hexd 08-16-2017, 06:12 PM
    (08-16-2017, 06:05 PM)Rooky_Ghost Wrote:
    (08-06-2017, 06:43 PM)Hexd Wrote:
    (08-06-2017, 06:04 PM)sParn Wrote:
    (07-28-2017, 09:57 PM)Hexd Wrote: How is it? any especially cool stuff you learned from it that you didn't know about Elon Musk?

    I'm currently raeding the Graphic Novel Paper Girls which is pretty great and is written by the writer of Saga which is my favorite graphic novel and has my favorite artist Fiona Staples working on it as well.


    Hey! It's awesome...the concepts he introduced into the space and automotive industry alone made me fascinated with him though I never really knew much about him as a person or entrepreneur. His childhood was interesting and I related with him on his curiosity especially when it came to computers as a lad. His startups and sometimes harsh, though progressive, methods of pushing his businesses forward continue to astound me, I'm particularly excited to see where things go with Neuralink being someone heavily into Transhumanism :)

    Now how's Paper Girls? I've heard of that and Saga just haven't read them yet :/


    That's awesome, any  particular harsh methods of pushing his business you could summarize? I think Elon is super inspiring and I hope him well in his businesses although I think Neuralink is a bit too much much I do look forward to the Tranhumanist evolution.

    Paper Girls is pretty good, very different to anything else I've read and Saga is amazing all time favorite and best written\drawn graphic novel I've read to date.


    Do you respect the women??


    Not quite sure what you're asking me?
  • lewdygaga 08-16-2017, 11:00 PM
    I really want to read Lovecraft's books... Meanwhile I'm reading the "Introduction to the programming with Python - Nilo Coutinho Menezes"
  • Rooky_Ghost 08-29-2017, 05:20 PM
    (08-16-2017, 11:00 PM)lewdygaga Wrote: I really want to read Lovecraft's books... Meanwhile I'm reading the "Introduction to the programming with Python - Nilo Coutinho Menezes"


    huehuehue
    Python sucks, Pascal-chan best grilll
  • 0w_ 09-04-2017, 07:24 AM
    i'm currently reading a science-fiction novel about future, time machines, time itself and what might happen to the human race in the future.
    i generally liked it, of course i didn't like/participate in some points but as a result it made me happy.

    what i *really* like is the while the main character is thinking about the universe, time, people, androids, dogs (holograms), at the same time the writer introduces us to the universe.

    btw the novel's name is How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe.
  • Backlash 09-16-2017, 09:38 PM (Edited 09-16-2017, 09:43 PM)
    I've recently found myself essentially addicted to Alfred Coppel's The Burning Mountain: A Novel of the Invasion of Japan. In this alternate history, the Trinity nuclear bomb test was a failure, which prompts the Allies to go forward with "Operation Downfall", the amphibious invasion planned for a few months after the war ended in real life.

    What sets it apart is that it glosses over Operation Olympic (the invasion of Kyushu) and begins at the start of Operation Coronet (the invasion of Honshu via the Kanto Plain), and that it's got an even split between Allied and Japanese viewpoint characters. Among others, some of the notable personages I've encountered are a US marine born and raised in Japan, an Imperial Army Air Corps flight instructor who finally gets the chance to see his enemy in a combat mission, a bombardier from a B-17 that bailed out behind enemy lines, and an IJA corporal who's at the end of his rope after spending fourteen days with two other men in a two-by three meter cavity of earth. The characters express a wide array of emotions regarding their enemies - horror at Imperial cruelties from the Americans, anger at the ruination of their homeland on the part of the Japanese - but these are presented entirely within the confines of the characters' minds and delivered without commentary. Atop all that are the soldiers' personal insecurities and struggles, which often command them above any notion of military duty.

    I could gush about this book for hours if pressed. But if you're a fan of World War II's Pacific Theater and have even a passing interest in what might've been, I'd reckon it's a must-read.
  • Infamia 09-28-2017, 10:08 AM
    the mayor of casterbridge.

    old book but still holds a retroactively interesting atmosphere.
  • GlassMoon 10-16-2017, 02:32 PM
    Just registered for a library card at my library. I missed renting and ordering books through the library as I did at my university, so I'm happy to do it again.

    The first book I ordered through loan is An Archaeological History of Japan: 30,000 B.C. to A.D. 700 by Koji Mizoguchi for some pretty special interest research. Until it arrives I'm going to read The Bacchae and Other Plays by Euripides. The Bacchae is one of my favorite Greek plays but it's the only one by him I've read.
  • Backlash 10-27-2017, 08:08 AM
    Well this is somethin'. Apparently Seven Seas now offers illustrated classics of English literature.

    In reality it's nothing more than a large-font paperback with a handful of illustrations sprinkled throughout, but you gotta hand it to 'em, it really does make the book more accessible. Sometimes, that's all you need to let your imagination run wild. ^^

    [Image: Z4AQ4zD.jpg]
  • dwell 11-05-2017, 09:41 PM
    (08-16-2017, 11:00 PM)lewdygaga Wrote: I really want to read Lovecraft's books... Meanwhile I'm reading the "Introduction to the programming with Python - Nilo Coutinho Menezes"


    I have read some of Lovecraft's stories and I have enjoyed them especially coming from Stephen King. What kind of horror do you like?
  • Heidegger 11-09-2017, 10:44 AM
    A lot papers of commercial and civil law.
    light novels and The Idiot by Dostoievsky. Second time reading Dostoievsky and still the best work of the russian
  • Saikou 11-10-2017, 01:15 AM
    in the middle of dante's inferno, putting off finishing it indefinitely
  • GlassMoon 11-27-2017, 09:06 AM
    (11-10-2017, 01:15 AM)Saikou Wrote: in the middle of dante's inferno, putting off finishing it indefinitely


    What translation, out of curiosity? If you enjoy it at all I can't recommend reading Purgatorio and Paradiso enough. The Inferno seems very random and hard to understand without the complete context of those other two.

    As for me, I'm reading a Penguin volume of Lovecraft's short stories. I first tried to read it a number of years ago when I was in high school and thought its prose style seemed artificial and over-labored, but now I'm liking it a lot more. Maybe just because I understand his literary and artistic references a lot more now. Once you divorce the themes of the stories from the flattening they've received through pop culture they still have power.
  • Saikou 11-27-2017, 03:13 PM
    (11-27-2017, 09:06 AM)GlassMoon Wrote:
    (11-10-2017, 01:15 AM)Saikou Wrote: in the middle of dante's inferno, putting off finishing it indefinitely


    What translation, out of curiosity? If you enjoy it at all I can't recommend reading Purgatorio and Paradiso enough. The Inferno seems very random and hard to understand without the complete context of those other two.


    john ciardi's translation
    the book is impossible for me to follow without the detailed explanations before and after each canto
  • GlassMoon 11-28-2017, 12:52 AM
    (11-27-2017, 03:13 PM)Saikou Wrote:
    (11-27-2017, 09:06 AM)GlassMoon Wrote:
    (11-10-2017, 01:15 AM)Saikou Wrote: in the middle of dante's inferno, putting off finishing it indefinitely


    What translation, out of curiosity? If you enjoy it at all I can't recommend reading Purgatorio and Paradiso enough. The Inferno seems very random and hard to understand without the complete context of those other two.


    john ciardi's translation
    the book is impossible for me to follow without the detailed explanations before and after each canto


    I admit that I haven't read Ciardi's all the way through, but from what I've read it definitely seemed a bit tortured and hard to follow. I guess that's what you get when trying to retain the rhymes.

    Mark Musa's translation doesn't rhyme like the original, but I can definitely recommend it because I think it is very lovely and in some ways flows more smoothly. Naturally you'll still need to scour the explanations and footnotes though.

    I think the next two books are even harder to follow in ways (lots of diatribes on Thomist theology), but I think it also makes the themes of the whole work a lot more cogent and beautiful.

    As you can tell I really love Dante!!! I've always wished I spoke Italian just so I could read his work in the original...
  • GlassMoon 02-26-2018, 05:10 AM
    Currently reading the Confucian classic that the excerpt on the left is from :)

    [Image: ubxwyv.jpg]
  • Backlash 02-27-2018, 12:04 AM (Edited 02-27-2018, 12:06 AM)
    (02-26-2018, 05:10 AM)GlassMoon Wrote: Currently reading the Confucian classic that the excerpt on the left is from :)


    I'm hardly a scholar of philosophy, but I get the hunch I'd be at odds with Confucius on pretty much everything he wrote. On the other hand, could you imagine a fantastic meeting between Laozi, Epicurus, and Diogenes the Cynic? Toss in Marx as their designated driver, and one might get something resembling my personal philosophy.

    [Image: DG9eGd4WAAAaE3R.jpg:large]
  • All in One 02-27-2018, 01:35 AM
    (02-27-2018, 12:04 AM)Backlash Wrote: I'm hardly a scholar of philosophy, but I get the hunch I'd be at odds with Confucius on pretty much everything he wrote. On the other hand, could you imagine a fantastic meeting between Laozi, Epicurus, and Diogenes the Cynic? Toss in Marx as their designated driver, and one might get something resembling my personal philosophy.


    Something tells me that Karl wouldn't be too thrilled by that designation.
  • Backlash 02-27-2018, 02:05 AM (Edited 02-27-2018, 02:06 AM)
    (02-27-2018, 01:35 AM)All in One Wrote:
    (02-27-2018, 12:04 AM)Backlash Wrote: I'm hardly a scholar of philosophy, but I get the hunch I'd be at odds with Confucius on pretty much everything he wrote. On the other hand, could you imagine a fantastic meeting between Laozi, Epicurus, and Diogenes the Cynic? Toss in Marx as their designated driver, and one might get something resembling my personal philosophy.


    Something tells me that Karl wouldn't be too thrilled by that designation.


    You might be right.

    [Image: D5m03RS.jpg]

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what are you reading?