How do I start drawing?

by Kitten

Kitten
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03-21-2016, 11:44 PM
#38546 (1)
I have always been jealous of good digital artists. I know the key to any skill is just practice and there is no direct shortcuts, but I was wondering where someone begins? I suck at drawing both digital and physical and have no idea what I am doing. Is there some kind of resource or practice you would recommend? How well does physical drawing skill correlate to digital drawing skill? Do you know of any tutorials you would suggest to a complete beginner? I just want to contribute a kawaii neko, kitsune, or adorable little chibi for all the nice people who have shared their own with the world. ^^
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malmon
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03-22-2016, 05:20 PM
#38565 (2)
Much love but no responses! Don't be fooled though, I don't know the first thing about drawing. I'm just here to give your thread a little bump :)

[Image: 68747470733a2f2f752e6e79612e69732f77757466626d2e6a7067]
„こころゆらゆらゆれてる”
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Kitten
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03-22-2016, 06:23 PM
#38573 (3)
(03-22-2016, 05:20 PM)malmon73 Wrote: Much love but no responses! Don't be fooled though, I don't know the first thing about drawing. I'm just here to give your thread a little bump :)

Thank you very much =^_^= .. I might just end up counter-referencing a thousand YouTube videos and Reddit posts and see if I can find some universally accepted starting path soon. I just feel so bad that I haven't been drawing since I was 6 years old like seemingly every artist ever and I won't be able to make good art in the next 10+ years. ;_;
EwanLan
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03-23-2016, 05:52 PM
#38608 (4)
The best way to get better is to just keep practising by making more and more artwork to develop your skills.

If you are interested in doing digital as well as physical I would recommend a graphics tablet, It can help bridge the gap between both different media's.

I am far from a perfect artist but I hope some of this helps you become the best artist for neko/kitsune/chibi :P
malmon
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03-23-2016, 05:56 PM
#38609 (5)
(03-23-2016, 05:52 PM)EwanLan Wrote: I would recommend a graphics tablet, It can help bridge the gap between both different media's.

Wouldn't drawing with a mouse be absolute torture anyway? Shame that tablets aren't the cheapest things around - though I just use mine for osu ^^

[Image: 68747470733a2f2f752e6e79612e69732f77757466626d2e6a7067]
„こころゆらゆらゆれてる”
Melancholy
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03-23-2016, 08:53 PM
#38617 (6)
Easiest way to start drawing is to pick up a pencil and paper.

Then just keep practicing.

I'm not a good artist myself, because I'm too lazy to practice.

metod
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03-24-2016, 03:40 AM
#38624 (7)
(03-23-2016, 05:56 PM)malmon73 Wrote: Wouldn't drawing with a mouse be absolute torture anyway?

Not for vector graphics. But generally, yeah.

WUBALUBADUBDUB!
monothedog
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03-24-2016, 02:20 PM
#38632 (8)
Sell your soul.

[Image: 687474703a2f2f692e696d6775722e636f6d2f59...702e706e67]
I love Revonzz
(Also it's cool to put stuff about yourself in your signature if someone else said it)
mumu
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03-25-2016, 09:27 PM (This post was last modified: 03-25-2016, 09:27 PM by mumu.)
#38697 (9)
i dont know how to draw (but heres my dA lol doramuu.deviantart.com)
but here's a cool video on how 2 draw draguns

[Image: 68747470733a2f2f696d672e62757a7a66656564...362e676966]
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Melancholy
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03-25-2016, 10:36 PM
#38705 (10)
(03-25-2016, 09:27 PM)lil mumu Wrote: -snip-

the return of based mumu

mumu
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03-25-2016, 10:37 PM
#38706 (11)
i've been had

[Image: 68747470733a2f2f696d672e62757a7a66656564...362e676966]
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Bitch-chan
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03-27-2016, 01:42 AM (This post was last modified: 03-27-2016, 01:44 AM by Bitch-chan.)
#38773 (12)
This is how I started. Line art. With a few drawings, you'll pretty much learn to draw with a mouse if you're into that. SAI + Line Drawing + Curve Tool. You just import a picture into SAI, lower the transparency and start drawing over it pretty much. The OC stuff may come later.






[Image: 68747470733a2f2f752e706f6d662e69732f7963...742e706e67]


[Image: 68747470733a2f2f752e706f6d662e69732f7874...612e706e67]


[Image: 68747470733a2f2f752e706f6d662e69732f6462...6b2e706e67]
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suicid3Panda
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03-27-2016, 09:16 AM
#38779 (13)
Drawing with pencil and paper vs drawing on a computer are night and day. I can draw fantastically (if i do say so myself) on paper, but on a tablet, its sooo different. You need to pick your medium first. If you want to be a digital artist you really NEED a tablet of some sort. Don't cheap out here.

When buying a tablet, keep in mind, you are pushing plastic against plastic. that isnt the same feeling of frictions and control that you get from pencil on paper. i'd advise to look for a tablet that has a slight texture to its surface. from there, its just a matter of practicing with the tools. 50% of drawing is understanding your tools. if you hand a digital artist some oil paint and canvas, they will fuck it up. Keep that in mind, and don't get discouraged.
mumu
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03-27-2016, 01:04 PM
#38785 (14)
(03-27-2016, 09:16 AM)suicid3Panda Wrote: Drawing with pencil and paper vs drawing on a computer are night and day. I can draw fantastically (if i do say so myself) on paper, but on a tablet, its sooo different. You need to pick your medium first. If you want to be a digital artist you really NEED a tablet of some sort. Don't cheap out here.

When buying a tablet, keep in mind, you are pushing plastic against plastic. that isnt the same feeling of frictions and control that you get from pencil on paper. i'd advise to look for a tablet that has a slight texture to its surface. from there, its just a matter of practicing with the tools. 50% of drawing is understanding your tools. if you hand a digital artist some oil paint and canvas, they will fuck it up. Keep that in mind, and don't get discouraged.

yeah i had a hard time learning to draw with a tablet

[Image: 68747470733a2f2f696d672e62757a7a66656564...362e676966]
Utsutsu
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03-30-2016, 07:38 AM
#38978 (15)
Learn how to sketch, then just look at images and try to replicate them.
Google different things, example eyes and try to see which ones fit.

I can't draw, but that's what helped me, kinda.
Backlash
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04-01-2016, 11:59 PM
#39130 (16)
GoBoiano may be the BuzzFeed of weebs, but I'll admit I enjoy their content. This listicle they published is a wee bit too advanced for beginners (just a bit), but it gave me an idea about the overall technique that goes into making high-quality art. Like all creative works, it's usually best to compartmentalize it into discrete steps as shown.

FukuchiChiisaia
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05-24-2016, 02:31 AM (This post was last modified: 05-24-2016, 02:34 AM by FukuchiChiisaia.)
#41712 (17)
First, you need a skill to notice the differences between poor and good art.
The common mistakes for beginner is they often think that their creation is good.
You should take a better look for differences between poor and good. Any kind of art just do.

Second, try to imitate any style that you love.
Discover and imitate any kind style of art that you love will make you draw at ease.
You might find to love art of Brian Kessinger, Kishida Mel, Mebae, Naoki Urasawa, Leonid Afremov, or Yanase Takayuki.
Simply, slowly you might comes to understand the basic of art by imitate their style.

Third, learn the basic.
Maybe your concepts is only something only comes from professional artist, but if you don't have any skill execute the concept, it means nothing.
There's a ton of tutorial on DeviantArt, Pixiv.

Fourth, don't draw the mainstream.
Draw the same ideas with others doesn't make you art artitically good.
Walking around the nature and watching some documentaries will give you a lot of concept.

BONUS:
Researching about any kind of art and its method is always a good start.

PS: If you doesn't want to explore a ton of art, just find the ideas on Colossal or Spotlight.pics

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11-18-2016, 06:08 AM
#63111 (18)
Firealpaca+Cheaap drawing tab and Leslie lumarie YT vids :D GL!

#Fantasy
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12-30-2016, 05:47 PM
#64630 (19)
The core of what to do has been pretty much said, but I'm going to throw some stuff that hopefully helps.

Probably a big chunk of becoming an artist is to visualize objects in how they're constructed. In translating objects to paper (or any 2d medium), you must convert what your eyes already see in real life to a medium that doesn't have depth.
So how do you portray depth with a flat object? You should use constructive drawing to understand that object, drawing through to understand how light affects it (since through shading, light is how we see everything) as well as it's limitations, like with joints and how they can move in some ways, and can't in others. "Construction" means you build up your object in easy-to-understand simple geometric shapes. Understanding large complex volumes with simple shapes is a step in the right direction. Having a handle for perspective, especially with these fundamental shapes (cube, sphere, cylinders, etc) will give you a much larger understanding of what I'm talking about, but it's not required.
A lot of "how-to-draw" books (especially how to draw manga) are total rubbish. Instead of being limited to drawing a very specific object in steps, you cannot necessarily understand that thing's volume, so you couldn't draw it in other angles or situations very easily. You should always practice something and understand how it can be built, than letting someone build it for you.

People say that practice makes perfect. And of course, they're absolutely correct. Practice isn't necessarily just getting into routine, it's also building visual knowledge and skill. You train both muscle memory (like drawing lines, circles, how to hold a pencil) and cementing your visual library. Drawing repetitively is essentially making "guesses" as to an optimal and correct way of drawing.
So you wake up one day, and draw a pot. It's possible it might be good, maybe even good enough with some shading and polishing to hang on the fridge! The issue is when your mind interprets it as "good". Since I'm guessing you aren't drawing pots very often, you'll fall into comfort with saying "this is good enough".
This is not a good mindset to get into.
If you draw a hundred pots, you'll start to draw it easier. (If you aren't fatigued at drawing a bunch of pots first!) Your mind and your hand know how to draw a damn pot! And once you know a pot, you'll know what makes up a pot and you can bend the rules. Make short pots, skinny pots, etc. This is essentially what getting something into your visual library is like.

People who are seriously into art will always say that you should stick strictly with drawing realism. I'm definitely not in the realm of an expert, but that isn't necessary. YES, you will most likely improve faster if you draw completely dedicated to realistic studies, but when improvements in drawing skill are in terms of months to years, you will likely be dragging yourself through inspirational mud the whole time. You want to draw manga? Go ahead. BUT, when you are wanting to improve, you should tread carefully to not get caught up in someone else's interpretation.
Drawing from someone else's creation is akin to drawing from their mind, in which you are making a copy of a copy. And like a JPEG that gets worse and worse quality as it's passed around, your interpretation is already steps away from the original "thing". Like I was saying before, it isn't a life-or-death thing to draw manga as opposed to realism, but you must be aware of the limitations of drawing an interpretation as opposed to drawing from life. (Even a realistic drawing is an artist's interpretation, it can be argued even a photo is an interpretation as it removes the feeling of depth from the real thing)

What you should do when copying from someone else's work is to understand how it is constructed. You will NOT benefit by copying wholesale from someone. At the very least, try to understand how they do what they did. Even better, you can go through sketching->lineart->coloring->post-processing to get a feel of how they get finished works.

This post will probably have some errors of judgment on my part so I might go back and edit + add some images later to split up monotony and make some of what I'm saying easier to understand.

Biggest thing to take from all this would be to take with a spoonful of salt. Question why for every step. Draw your own conclusions. Find what works for you.
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